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Springfield Cardinals at Tulsa Drillers

ONEOK Field201 North Elgin Avenue, Tulsa, OK
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Springfield Cardinals at Tulsa Drillers

ONEOK Field201 North Elgin Avenue, Tulsa, OK
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Springfield Cardinals at Tulsa Drillers

ONEOK Field201 North Elgin Avenue, Tulsa, OK
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ONEOK Field201 North Elgin Avenue, Tulsa, OK
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Frisco Roughriders at Tulsa Drillers

ONEOK Field201 North Elgin Avenue, Tulsa, OK
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  • Tulsa Police say a suspect has been arrested in Tulsa's 26th homicide for the year. 20-year old Kaleb Young was arrested by Warrants Detectives outside his home at 1600 N. Boston Pl. on Monday's murder. The victim's family has not been contacted. Young was transported to Detective Division and will be booked in on one count of first degree murder and three counts of Shooting with Intent to Kill. One of the other three victims is not expected to live, but is still alive at this point.
  • UPDATE: TPD lead homicide detective Sgt. Brandon Watkins confirms that police have a suspect in custody, suspected of killing one person and injuring three others in the shootings at Red Fox Apartments. He tells KRMG the TPD warrants unit tracked down the suspect. No names have been released yet. Police were called to an apartment complex near 15th and Memorial Dr. around 1:30 Monday afternoon for a homicide. Officers on the scene tell KRMG that one person was killed. Three others were taken to the hospital with injuries.One victim was apparently in critical condition; witnesses said that person had been shot in the head. Officers were called to the scene at the Red Fox Apartments at 1:20 p.m. TPD Capt. Walter Busby told KRMG at the scene that they had developed some information indicating that the shootings evolved out of a domestic dispute of some kind. No word yet on the identity of the victims.
  • Susan Holmes’ home, corner store and roadside beef jerky stand are right off Oklahoma Highway 31, putting them in the path of trucks hauling ash and waste from a power plant that burns the high-sulfur coal mined near this small town. For years, when Bokoshe residents were outside, the powdery ash blowing from the trucks and the ash dump on the edge of town would “kind of engulf you,” Holmes said. “They drove by, and you just couldn’t breathe.” Over three decades, the ash dump grew into a hill five stories high. Townspeople regard the Environmental Protection Agency as the only source of serious environmental enforcement. Whenever people took their worries about ash-contaminated air and water to state lawmakers and regulators, “none of them cared,” Holmes said. So the residents of this 500-person town have nothing but bitter warnings for similarly situated communities now that President Donald Trump’s EPA has approved Oklahoma to be the first state to take over permitting and enforcement on coal-ash sites. “They’re going to do absolutely nothing,” predicted Tim Tanksley, a rancher in Bokoshe, about 130 miles southeast of Tulsa in a Choctaw Nation coal patch that helped fuel the railroads. Around the country, the EPA under Trump is delegating a widening range of public health and environmental enforcement to states, saying local officials know best how to deal with local problems. Critics contend federal regulators are making a dangerous retreat on enforcement that puts people and the environment at greater risk. One administration initiative would give states more authority over emissions from coal-fired power plants. Another would remove federal protections for millions of miles of waterways and wetlands.
  • A body was found in the Arkansas River, near 91st and Riverside, shortly after 10:00 Monday morning. Firefighters say they spotted the body while checking along the river bank after a mans was reported missing about ten days ago. A medical examiner will now determine the cause of death and identify the body. Tune to NEWS102.3 and AM740 KRMG for the latest.
  • FOX23 NEWS102.3 KRMG Chief Meteorologist James Aydelott says a few rounds of storms could move our way during the day Monday. The main risk is wind and hail. The higher risk of severe weather begins by mid-afternoon and will stick around through the evening.  Aydelott says tornadoes and flooding will be the main threat with this round. The third risk may develop Tuesday morning, with small quick spin-up tornadoes possible. Today is the anniversary of the massive E-F5 tornado that hit Moore, killing 24 people in 2013. Among those killed were seven young children at Plaza Towers Elementary. Many schools closed ahead of the storms. Click HERE for a complete list of school closings. Broken Arrow school leaders say students may be picked up after 1:30 p.m. without an attendance penalty. Governor Kevin Stitt is urging Oklahomans to be prepared for severe weather across the state, including strong tornadoes, damaging winds, very large hail, heavy rainfall, and flash flooding.

Washington Insider

  • The struggle between Democrats in the House and President Donald Trump over the Russia investigation intensified on Monday with the White House telling former Counsel Don McGahn not to honor a subpoena for  his testimony on Tuesday before the House Judiciary Committee, as Democrats said it was all part of a broad effort the President and the Trump Administration to stonewall Congress about the Mueller Report and other investigations. In a letter to Democrats, McGahn's lawyer William Burck said, 'the President has unambiguously directed my client not to comply with the Committee’s subpoena for testimony.' 'Under these circumstances, and also conscious of the duties he, as an attorney, owes to his former client, Mr. McGahn must decline to appear at the hearing,' the letter added. Democrats said they would still convene the hearing at 10 am EDT on Tuesday, as they held out the possibility of finding McGahn in contempt, just as the same committee voted to find Attorney General William Barr in contempt for refusing to honor a subpoena for an unredacted version of the Mueller Report. Democrats wanted testimony from McGahn because of the information he gave to investigators for the Mueller investigation, in which McGahn detailed repeated demands by President Trump to oust the Special Counsel. While President Trump has sternly denied that he ever ordered McGahn to get rid of Mueller, the evidence offered by the Special Counsel painted a different picture. McGahn testified that the President called him on June 17, 2017 - about a month after Mueller had been named as Special Counsel - and pressed for Mueller to be ousted, an order that McGahn repeatedly ignored. On page 300 of the Mueller Report, 'McGahn recalled the President telling him 'Mueller has to go' and 'Call me back when you do it.''  The Mueller Report described McGahn - who reportedly answered questions for 30 hours over multiple interviews - as a 'credible witness with no motive to lie or exaggerate.' McGahn also claimed in his testimony that once news of the President's request was reported in the press, Mr. Trump then pressed McGahn to dispute the veracity of the story that the President had pressed for Mueller's ouster. McGahn refused to do what the President had asked. The White House based its refusal for McGahn to testify on a new 15 page legal opinion from the Justice Department, which said McGahn - as a former top adviser - was under no requirement to testify before Congress. 'The President's immediate advisers are an extension of the President and are likewise entitled to absolute immunity from compelled congressional testimony,' the Office of Legal Counsel opinion stated. In summary, the Justice Department said simply, 'we conclude that Mr. McGahn is not legally required to appear before the Committee.' Democrats denounced the decision, and charged it was just adding more evidence to what they say is a cover up, focused on obscuring obstruction of justice by President Trump. 'This move is just the latest act of obstruction from the White House that includes its blanket refusal to cooperate with this Committee,' said Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY), the Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. 'The President is intimidating witnesses and stonewalling the American people and the rule of law. Congress and the American people deserve answers from Mr. McGahn,' said Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon (D-PA). '(T)he White House Counsel serves interests of the American people, not the President, and their conversations do not have the protection of blanket attorney-client privilege,' said Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA). 'It’s pretty clear what the Trump Administration is doing here,' said Sen. Chris Coons (D-DE), 'they’re trying to hide the facts from the American people.' Democrats have promised to move forward to hold McGahn in Contempt of Congress - but there has also been discussion of other penalties, from what is known as 'inherent contempt' - which could involve levying fines against those who refuse to cooperate with investigations by Congress. 'The cover-up continues,' said Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA). 'And we will fight it.
  • In a notable break with the history of their home states, the Republican Leader of the U.S. Senate from Kentucky and a top Democrat from Virginia officially introduced a bill on Monday which would increase the minimum age to buy cigarettes and any other tobacco products from 18 to 21 years. 'Now is the time to do it,' Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said on the Senate floor, as he rattled off negative statistics about cancer related to tobacco use in the Bluegrass State. 'Our state once grew tobacco like none other, and now we're being hit by the health consequences of tobacco use like none other,' McConnell said, noting the dangers of e-cigarettes and vaping to those under the age of 18. 'The health of our children is literally at stake,' McConnell added. McConnell offered the bill along with Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA), the Vice Presidential nominee of the Democratic Party in 2016, who also hails from a state with historic ties to the tobacco industry. 'Like Sen. McConnell, I come from a tobacco state,' Kaine said in remarks on the Senate floor, joining the Majority Leader in giving a history lesson about his state, and the influence of tobacco. 'We're backsliding,' Kaine said, nothing the recent increase in youth tobacco use, as he joined in blaming e-cigarettes and vaping. 'We encourage the states to pass their own laws,' Kaine added, as he said the new age limit would also be applied to members of the military services. “Raising the sales age for tobacco nationwide is one of several policy changes that are essential to reach the tobacco endgame of eliminating tobacco use and nicotine addiction,” said Nancy Brown, the head of the American Heart Association, which offered its quick support. McConnell is running for re-election in 2020, and as the leader of the Senate, he could bring the bill up for action at any time.
  • With members of the House and Senate leaving town for a ten day break at the end of this week, the future of billions of dollars in disaster relief for victims of hurricanes, flooding, wildfires, tornadoes, and more remains in limbo in the halls of Congress, as the Senate struggles to finalize a deal, with opposition by President Donald Trump to extra aid for Puerto Rico one of the stumbling blocks. 'Now it’s time for Congress to pass the disaster relief bill,' Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL) tweeted on Sunday. 'Our Panhandle communities have waited long enough,' he said, referring to the extreme damage caused by Hurricane Michael last year. But while the House has passed two different relief bills - a $14 billion package in January, and a $19 billion plan earlier this month - the Senate has been unable to come to an agreement, with money for Puerto Rico, and possible extra money to deal with the surge of immigrants along the southern border still in the mix. 'What is happening at the border is tragic, and we hope to address some of that in the supplemental that is coming, the disaster supplemental, to provide some of the resources that are needed there,' said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi last week. But so far, that broader deal - which would likely push the price tag of the bill over $20 billion - has not come together. Meanwhile, the Trump Administration is still holding back $16 billion in already approved disaster aid for areas hit by hurricanes in 2017, including $4 billion for Texas, and $8.2 billion for Puerto Rico. Last week, the feds released $1.4 billion in already approved disaster funding for states hit by disasters in 2018 - but left the much larger amount of 2017 money still on the shelf, even though officials have promised for months that it was about to be released. The 2018 money included $448 million for Florida, and nearly $35 million for Georgia to deal with Hurricane Michael damage - but much larger sums of aid, including money to rebuild Tyndall Air Force Base - are caught up in the disaster bill before Congress. And one of the main reasons that disaster bill has been stuck in the Senate since January is President Trump's opposition to extra aid for Puerto Rico. Last week, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell vowed to have a vote on disaster aid before the Senate leaves town for Memorial Day. 'I'm not going to be sending members of either party home to these storm and flood ravaged states without at least some action,' McConnell said. If key Senators can't reach an agreement, the latest $19.1 billion House-passed bill is ready for action on the Senate calendar. The clock is ticking on any deal - the House is scheduled to leave town by Thursday afternoon.
  • The political fallout from the Mueller Report received an unexpected jolt on Saturday from a Republican member of the U.S. House, as Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI), a more libertarian lawmaker who has often been a critic of the President, became the first GOP member of Congress to open the door for the President Trump's impeachment, saying it's clear Mr. 'Trump has engaged in impeachable conduct.' In a series of posts on Twitter, Amash - a member of the House Freedom Caucus - accused Attorney General William Barr of having 'deliberately misrepresented' the findings and evidence of the Mueller Report. 'In comparing Barr’s principal conclusions, congressional testimony, and other statements to Mueller’s report, it is clear that Barr intended to mislead the public about Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s analysis and findings,' Amash said, making the calls for impeachment now bipartisan. 'Mueller’s report identifies multiple examples of conduct satisfying all the elements of obstruction of justice, and undoubtedly any person who is not the president of the United States would be indicted based on such evidence,' Amash said, echoing an argument heard from many Democrats. Democrats welcomed Amash's declaration. 'This is a very consequential statement,' said Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-VA). 'Thank you Justin Amash for putting country ahead of party.' 'We can now have bipartisan impeachment proceedings. Thank you, @justinamash,' said Rep. Seth Moulton (D-MA). Amash chided members of both parties for reacting to the Mueller Report simply because of who was targeted, basically predicting that if a Democrat had been in the White House, the reactions would have been completely opposite 'We’ve witnessed members of Congress from both parties shift their views 180 degrees — on the importance of character, on the principles of obstruction of justice — depending on whether they’re discussing Bill Clinton or Donald Trump,' Amash added on Twitter. There was no evidence that Amash's statement was going to open the flood gates in Congress against the President - but it will give Democrats the ability to say there are bipartisan concerns about President Trump. “Call him the lone member of the Republican Integrity Caucus,” said Congressional scholar Norm Ornstein, who has been a frequent critic of the President. Fellow Republican Congressman, Rep. Ken Buck (R-CO) took a mild jab at Amash, writing on Twitter that his nickname for Amash was right, using the hashtag, 'Often Wrong Never In Doubt.
  • The Friday decision by President Donald Trump to lift special tariffs on steel and aluminum imported from Canada and Mexico not only defused a year old trade battle with those two neighbors, but also strengthened the prospects in the U.S. Congress for a revised free trade agreement negotiated by the Trump Administration. 'The biggest hurdle to ratifying USMCA has been lifted,' said Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA), who had helped lead opposition to the tariffs, saying it would prevent the U.S., Mexico, Canada trade deal from being approved by Congress.  Not only will the U.S. drop import duties on steel and aluminum from Canada and Mexico, but those countries will drop retaliatory tariffs against a variety of American exports, which had caused collateral economic damage to a variety of U.S. businesses. 'These tariffs, and the retaliation they caused, have hurt American farmers, manufacturers, businesses and consumers across the country,' said the group Tariffs Hurt the Heartland. 'These tariffs are damaging the U.S. manufacturing sector, and particularly downstream U.S. steel and aluminum consuming companies,' said the Coalition of American Metals Manufacturers and Users. Many voices in the U.S. and Canada praised Grassley for helping push the President to drop the 25 percent tariff on steel and 10 percent tariff on aluminum imports from Mexico and Canada, as Grassley and GOP Senators repeatedly made clear to President Trump that a new U.S.-Mexico-Canada free trade deal would go nowhere in Congress until that happened. 'The agreement with Canada and Mexico to lift steel and aluminum tariffs and retaliation without quotas will allow the U.S. to better target China’s unfair trade practices and pave the way for the USMCA,' said Rep. Jackie Walorski (R-IN). 'This is great news we’ve reached a deal on Steel and Aluminum,' said Rep. Steve Watkins (R-KS). 'Kansas exports to Canada and Mexico in 2017 totaled $4.4 billion.' 'It is good these tariffs will be lifted,' said Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer. 'I've always said we should be focusing efforts on China — not Mexico, Canada, Europe.' But Democrats have also raised a series of other questions about the trade agreement - which still has not been submitted to the Congress for a vote, even though it was finalized last year. In the wake of the tariffs announcement, Vice President Mike Pence announced on Friday that he would go to meet the Canadian Prime Minister on May 30. While this move to ease tariffs will certainly help U.S. farmers and other businesses, there is still great uncertainty involving retaliation by China - in a separate trade dispute sparked by President Trump's aggressive efforts to levy tariffs on American trading partners. “We actually had a deal and they broke it,” the President said of the Chinese on Friday, referring to last minute demands and changes that Beijing thought it could gain from Mr. Trump. It did not work. “I said, 'Can't do that. Sorry, you can't do that,'” the President said in a speech.