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Concerts

Jul 26

Charlie Hunter and Lucy Woodward

Duet Jazz108 N Detroit Ave, Tulsa, OK
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Jul 27

Devre Jackson

Duet Jazz108 N Detroit Ave, Tulsa, OK
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Jul 27

REO Speedwagon

River Spirit Casino - Tulsa8330 Riverside Pkwy, Tulsa, OK
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Jul 28

Marshall Tucker Band

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Jul 28

Alice Cooper / Halestorm

The Zoo Amphitheatre2101 NE 50th St., Oklahoma City, OK 73111
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Jul 31

The Dead South

Cains Ballroom423 N Main St, Tulsa, OK 74103
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Jul 31

The Dead South

Cain's Ballroom423 North Main Street, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 1

Rachel Bachman

Duet Jazz108 N Detroit Ave, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 1

Sugarland

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 1

Jamestown Revival

Vanguard - OK222 North Main Street, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 1

Jamestown Revival

The Vanguard222 N Main St, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 1

Sugarland

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 3

Olivia Duhon

Duet Jazz108 N Detroit Ave, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 3

Reggae DanceHall Explosion

Avenue 21 Nightclub & Bar12570 east 21st street,, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 4

38 Special

The Joint-Hard Rock & Casino Tulsa777 West Cherokee Street, Catoosa, OK
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Aug 9

Brian Gorrell

Duet Jazz108 N Detroit Ave, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 11

Joan Osborne

Cain's Ballroom423 North Main Street, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 14

Hellyeah

Diamond Ballroom OKC8001 S Eastern Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73149
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Aug 15

Drew Thomas

Duet Jazz108 N Detroit Ave, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 16

Flatland Cavalry

Cains Ballroom423 N Main St, Tulsa, OK 74103
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Aug 16

Nickelback

River Spirit Casino - Tulsa8330 Riverside Pkwy, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 16

Free Samples

Duet Jazz108 N Detroit Ave, Tulsa, OK
Aug 16

Flatland Cavalry w/ Jason Eady

Cain's Ballroom423 North Main Street, Tulsa, OK
Aug 17

92.1 The Beat - Back To School Bash

BOK Center200 South Denver Ave W, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 21

Brad Henderson

Duet Jazz108 N Detroit Ave, Tulsa, OK
Aug 22
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Aug 22

Chris Isaak

River Spirit Casino - Tulsa8330 Riverside Pkwy, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 22

Koe Wetzel

Cain's Ballroom423 North Main Street, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 23

Jeremy Thomas Quartet

Duet Jazz108 N Detroit Ave, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 24

The Zuits

Duet Jazz108 N Detroit Ave, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 25

Rodney Crowell

Cain's Ballroom423 North Main Street, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 26

Zakk Sabbath

Cain's Ballroom423 North Main Street, Tulsa, OK
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Aug 26

Chris Brown

Chesapeake Energy Arena100 W. Reno Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73102
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  • The website Chamber of Commerce has ranked the best cities to live in Oklahoma. And there's just no competing apparently with the suburbs and the medium-size towns. They took all the top spots. Enid, Broken Arrow, and Bixby were the top three. The website looked at factors like income, jobs available, housing costs, education, and health. Rounding out the top 10, in order, were Ponca City, Edmond, Owasso, Bartlesville, Norman, Stillwater, and Ardmore. You can read more about the list here.
  • People who get the packet to apply for disaster relief from the Federal Emergency Management Agency will find a Small Business Administration loan application inside. “Some people are like 'well I don't need a loan,' or 'I don't want a loan,' and they fail to fill it out,” FEMA spokesman Scott Sanders tells KRMG, “and then we have to kick the application back to them and say 'you still got to fill out the application.' So it holds up the process. So I tell people 'fill out the entire application, the FEMA part and the SBA part.'” Many of those people think it won't apply to them, because they're not business owners. But it's the SBA that handles long-term, low-interest loans for disaster victims - not FEMA. And that includes loans for homeowners, non-profits, even renters. SBA spokesman David Reetz tells KRMG there's a lot of assistance available. “Up to $200,000 for a homeowner, a renter. Up to $40,000 for personal property, cars, furniture, clothing you name it,” Reetz said Wednesday. “Businesses, of course we do that too, up to $2 million.” And importantly, a business doesn't even have to suffer actual physical damage to qualify for a loan. For example, if a restaurant had to close for several days because all the roads leading to it were flooded. “They have a cash flow problem, and the SBA has economic injury disaster loans available that are geared strictly to cash flow, if they've experienced no physical damage whatsoever,” Reetz said. To get started, storm or flood victims can contact the agencies online, by phone, or even by using an app on a smartphone. SBA: 800-659-2955 SBA Disaster Assistance website FEMA: 800-621-3362 FEMA Disaster Assistance websiteFEMA mobile app
  • Former Oklahoma Attorney General Drew Edmondson is co-chair of newly formed National Law Enforcement Council (NLEC). The group is dedicated to enforcing federal, state, and local laws against animal cruelty.  Edmonson says animal cruelty cases are a good indicator of possible future crimes on people. “One measure of a civil society is how it treats its most vulnerable members, and few are as vulnerable as the animals,” said Edmondson.  There is a documented link between animal cruelty and other forms of human-on-human violence and criminal conduct.  The FBI’s homicidal triad includes early-age acts of animal cruelty. Animal fights are often staging grounds for a range of other illegal behavior.  In homes where a man harms a spouse or a girlfriend, he will often turn his violent instincts toward a child or an animal. The NLEC is urging increased funding for anti-cruelty enforcement at the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The council will also advocate for the passage of the Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture (PACT) Act, which would create a national anti-cruelty statute to crack down on perpetrators of acts of malicious cruelty with a federal nexus.
  • After decades of improvement, America’s air may not be getting any cleaner. Over the last two years the nation had more polluted air days than just a few years earlier, federal data shows. While it remains unclear whether this is the beginning of a trend, health experts say it’s troubling to see air quality progress stagnate. There were 15% more days with unhealthy air in America both last year and the year before than there were on average from 2013 through 2016, the four years when America had its fewest number of those days since at least 1980. President Donald Trump has repeatedly claimed just the opposite, saying earlier this month in Ireland: “We have the cleanest air in the world, in the United States, and it’s gotten better since I’m president.”  That’s not quite the case. There were noticeably more polluted air days each year in the president’s first two years in office than any of the four years before, according to new Environmental Protection Agency data analyzed by The Associated Press. The Trump administration is expected to replace an Obama-era rule designed to limit emissions from electric power plants on Wednesday. Called the Clean Power Plan, it would have gradually phased out coal-burning power plants that emit both air pollutants and heat-trapping gases responsible for climate change.
  • A 72-year-old Walmart greeter in Texas said he was only doing his job when he was allegedly punched in the face by a customer Friday night. >> Read more trending news  Mohinder Singh Randhawa was checking the receipt of Craig Valentine, 42, of Hockley, at a Walmart in Cypress when he noticed a case of Gatorade had not been paid for, KTRK reported. >> Sisters turn government shutdown into Walmart cheesecake deal 'I told him if you want, you can scan and take it,' Randhawa told the television station. 'I never told him he was stealing.' According to investigators who watched surveillance video, Valentine became angry and yelled at Randhawa. According to a probable cause affidavit filed in Harris County District Court, Valentine 'chest bumped' Randhawa before punching him. 'He punched on my face with a closed right hand,' Randhawa, who has worked at Walmart for 15 years told KTRK. 'I fell down on the ground.' According to the probable cause affidavit, Valentine called Walmart management Monday to apologize and admitted to a Harris County investigator he punched Randhawa. Valentine was arrested Tuesday and charged with injury to an elderly person, according to Harris County court records. He posted $1,000 bail later in the day and is expected to appear in court Wednesday, according to court records. Randhawa, meanwhile, said he was shaken up by the incident.  'Yes, I'm scared to work that position because it never happened to me,' Randhawa told KTRK.. 'I was doing my duty. I was doing what I was supposed to do.

Washington Insider

  • Even with no agreement as yet between the White House and Congress on budget levels for 2020, the House on Wednesday approved a package of four funding bills worth nearly $1 trillion for next year, and started work on five other spending measures for the operations of the federal government, with no clear idea of what President Donald Trump would accept for next year's budget. The first spending 'minibus' included $713 billion for the military, and nearly $270 billion in funding covering a range of health, education, labor, energy, and water programs, along with foreign aid, and money for the State Department. The 226-203 vote was mainly along party lines, as all Republicans were joined by seven Democrats in opposing the bill, even though it included funding for the military, a top GOP priority. Republicans though objected to provisions in the bill which would prevent the President from shifting money from the Pentagon to construction of a wall along the southern border with Mexico. The House then moved on to a second funding package - this one combines five different spending bills for an array of government agencies, from the Department of Justice to NASA, agricultural programs, the EPA, National Park Service, military construction, the VA, transportation, housing, and more. 290 different amendments were made in order to the second 'minibus' plan, as House Democrats try to get as many of 12 funding bills passed this summer, in an effort to prevent a government shutdown when the new fiscal year begins on October 1. But there's one problem with that effort - no agreement has been reached with the White House on exactly how much should be spent in 2020 - meaning all of this work could be for naught. 'This bill is going nowhere,' said Rep. Steve Womack (R-AR), the top Republican on the House Budget Committee. 'It is a waste of time,' Womack said on the House floor, as Republicans protested the lack of a budget agreement for next year. The action on next year's spending bills came as Capitol Hill talks involving top lawmakers and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin produced no agreement on how to deal with current budget 'caps' which limit how much can be spent in 2020. If there is no deal, automatic spending cuts known as the 'sequester' would kick in, slashing billions from the military and non-defense spending programs, a politically unpalatable choice for both parties. For example, total military spending in 2019 is $716 billion; President Trump wants $750 billion in 2020. But under the spending limits from a 2011 bipartisan budget deal, the cap on defense spending in 2020 would be $576 billion, down from the current spending levels of $647 billion, a reduction of $71 billion. The sequester would cut domestic spending less, because it has had a smaller rate of increase over the last two years when compared to the defense budget; non-defense spending would have to be reduced to $542 billion, a cut of $55 billion. 'While we did not reach an agreement, today’s conversation advanced our bipartisan discussions,' said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer in a statement, as they urged the President to stay on the sidelines. 'If the House and Senate could work their will without interference from the President, we could come to a good agreement much more quickly,' the top Democrats added.
  • After weeks of negotiations over a White House request for extra money to deal with a surge of illegal immigrants along the southern border with Mexico, Senators on a key spending panel voted 30-1 on Wednesday to approve a $4.59 billion spending package to insure that various federal agencies have enough money to address what President Donald Trump has said is a crisis at the border. 'This situation as most of us realize is past the breaking point,' said Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL). 'I believe we must act.' 'The fact is that we do have a humanitarian crisis on the border that does need to be addressed,' said Sen. Jon Tester (D-MT), who recounted crowded holding facilities for illegal immigrants. 'We've seen big numbers in the past, but we're going to exceed that this year,' said Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO). 'This bill is absolutely necessary,' said Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV). 'There are families and children who need our support.' The only 'no' vote in the Senate Appropriations Committee came from Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-OR). The bill only deals with money to help address the humanitarian needs along the border - it does not address any changes in U.S. immigration laws desired by President Trump. On Thursday, the Senate Judiciary Committee had been scheduled to start work on a bill which would make some of those immigration reforms, but that work will be delayed into July in search of a bipartisan agreement. “This is not a crisis - this is a disaster,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), who is leading President Trump's charge to change immigration laws. 'Our immigration laws are a disgrace and the Democrats can get together with the Republicans and solve the problem quickly,' the President told his campaign kickoff rally on Tuesday night in Orlando, Florida. It's expected the full Senate could vote on the package next week. It is not clear if the House would follow suit before lawmakers leave town at the end of June for a break during the week of July Fourth. The text of the Senate bill can be found here. A section-by-summary of the legislation from committee Republicans is here.
  • Even as President Donald Trump and top Republicans in Congress call on Democratic leaders in the U.S. House to allow a vote on a new trade deal with Mexico and Canada, the President's top trade negotiator told Senators on Tuesday that there's still no set date for when the agreement would be submitted to the Congress 'I believe we're on track, I believe we are making progress,' said United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. Asked by a GOP Senator about discussions with Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Lighthizer gave no public hint about any problems. 'My hope is that over the course of the next several weeks, that we can make substantial progress,' Lighthizer added, as he said talks with Pelosi had been 'constructive.' Democrats have been pressing the Trump Administration over the enforcement of new labor reforms in Mexico, worried that the government won't adequately enforce the changes. Asked by Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) when to expect a vote in Congress, Lighthizer gave no concrete date - as the trade agreement has not yet been formally submitted to the Congress. At a hearing of the Senate Finance Committee, Lighthizer faced some verbal slings and arrows from both parties about the President's trade policies. 'I do not agree that tariffs should be the tool we use in every instance to achieve our trade policy goals,' said Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA). 'China's market is now more closed off to American goods and American agriculture than before the trade war began,' said Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR), as he complained about the impact of the President's tweets on trade policy. For the most part, Lighthizer did not engage in pitched battles with Democrats over trade matters, repeatedly stressing common ground over trade disputes with China and final talks over the USMCA trade deal. As for China, Lighthizer made clear that President Trump isn't bluffing when it comes to additional tariffs on Chinese goods, acknowledging to Senators that the next round could have a bigger impact, to include items like laptop computers and cell phones. Lighthizer could have a somewhat more partisan reception on Wednesday, when he testifies on the same issues before the House Ways and Means Committee.
  • Five weeks after announcing his intent to nominate Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan for the top job at the Pentagon, President Donald Trump abruptly announced Tuesday that Shanahan was no longer under consideration, and would be replaced by the Secretary of the Army. 'Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan, who has done a wonderful job, has decided not to go forward with his confirmation process so that he can devote more time to his family,' the President said, announcing that Army Secretary Mark Esper would be named as the new Acting Secretary of Defense. President Trump had announced on May 9 that he intended to nominate Shanahan to the post; he had been acting Secretary since the start of 2019, replacing former Secretary James Mattis, who resigned at the end of December. The move by the President came hours after reports by news organizations that Shanahan's FBI background check had been delayed because of an issue involving a domestic dispute with his ex-wife in 2010. Shanahan had been meeting with Senators in recent weeks as a prelude to his confirmation hearings - but no date for those hearings had been set by the Senate Armed Services Committee, and no formal nomination had been made by the President. It had led to speculation that Shanahan's nomination could be in jeopardy. The move comes at an awkward time for the Pentagon, as Shanahan had been serving as Acting Defense Secretary since January 1, after taking over for ex-defense chief James Mattis. Mattis resigned at the end of 2018 after a dispute with President Trump over U.S. troop levels in Syria and Afghanistan.It means the U.S. will go well over a half year without a Senate-confirmed Secretary of Defense, a point noted by lawmakers on Capitol Hill. “This job should be filled in a matter of a few weeks, not months,” said Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-TX), the top Republican on the House Armed Services Committee. “We urgently need a Secretary of Defense that has the confidence of the President, the Congress, and the country,” Thornberry said.
  • It was one year ago this week that I returned to the radio after a two year absence, with a new computer generated voice which we call 'Jamie Dupree 2.0' - a high tech invention which has allowed me to continue my radio news work, even after an unknown medical problem took away my voice. After doing your job one way for over thirty years, it has taken a little time for me to get used to operating the controls of Jamie Dupree 2.0, which produces a voice that sounds like me, but no matter how advanced it is, it can also go haywire in a split second and sound like a bad robot. 1. First, a recap for those who might not know the story. In the Spring of 2016, I was covering the race for President. Everything was fine. I took an Easter vacation with my family, got a stomach bug, and suddenly my voice started having problems. It's now to the point where I can barely talk, with the diagnosis being a neurological dystonia - the signals from my brain to my tongue and throat are getting messed up somewhere along the way, and my mouth just won't work correctly to form words and sounds associated with speech most of the time. My company found a firm in Scotland, CereProc, which built a computer version of my voice from my audio archives, using tapes from my old radio news stories. 2.  Jamie Dupree 2.0 just isn't just typing some words. It would be nice if I could just type my radio scripts, hit a button, and magically have a perfect audio file for my next radio newscast. But it's a bit more complicated than that, as the field of computer generated voices is still in its infancy. Luckily, there are special computer commands which can be employed with the Text-to-Speech program that runs with my special voice. Those commands allow you to slow words at the end of sentences, mimic the more natural ways that we speed up and slow down during regular speech, and find ways to make the overall sound less robotic. It makes for some clutter on screen, but this is what one of my typical radio news scripts might look like: 3. Some Jamie Dupree 2.0 words just don't sound right. For whatever reasons, there are some words and phrases which don't come out right when you type them in. The last name of Rudy Giuliani works perfectly, but the last name of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross does not - I have to use 'Ros' instead. Robert Mueller's last name came out as 'Myoo-ler,' so I had to spell it as 'Muller' to get it to sound right. Those are just a couple of examples of how, over the last year, I've had to do a lot of experimenting to figure out how to sound out certain things, which can be frustrating when you need to get a story done for the next newscast. Like one of the Democratic hopefuls for President, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg. That's hard for most people to say, let alone for me to try to figure out how to get my computer voice to say it. So far, I've settled on this: Pete Budda jidge. Here are some other names and words that I have to get creative with: 4. Stumbling on ways to make the 2.0 sound more real. As I did more and more work over the last year with my new voice, one of the most obvious problems was trying to figure out how to mimic our own real voices, as we speed up and slow down certain words and sounds. XML commands dealing with 'emphasis' didn't really work. I tried using my audio editor program to add some emphasis to my words, but that only was a minimal success. By accident, I found that by repeating a word or phrase, it would sound different - sometimes I would get exactly the right feel and emphasis. In the following example, I wanted a little more 'oomph' for the phrase, 'President Trump tweeted from Air Force One.' When you watch the video below, you will hear the original version of the audio produced by Jamie Dupree 2.0, followed by the version where I had it say the same phrase five times in a row. Then the two are compared at then end of the 30 second video. For some reason, the repetition creates a little more emphasis. Why? I don't know. I don't really care.  All I know is that I found a shortcut which makes it sound better. 5. The reaction to 2.0 continues to be mostly positive. Remember, these are the days of social media, so it's not difficult to make your voice heard, and tell me that you never liked me in the first place, and you're happy that my real voice doesn't work.  But those messages only spur me to keep going and to work harder at being heard on the radio.  I don't want to be using this computer voice technology, but thankfully for my family, it's available, and it has allowed me to continue in my career as a radio reporter covering Capitol Hill.   As I have detailed above, it's not a simple process to get a story on the air.  It takes time to mold the words into the correct sounds, and get that into our radio newscasts.   It would be much quicker to just open my mouth, hit the record button, and start talking.  For whatever reason, my brain won't allow that to happen.